Bappi Lahiri Honored by The World BOOK OF RECORDS, UK, as the Originator of Disco beat in Indian cinema, ‘JIMMY JIMMY’ is World’s most popular song

After winning four Lifetime Achievement Awards this month, veteran singer-composer Bappi Lahiri has now been honoured by The World Book of Records, UK as Originator of Disco Beat in Indian Cinema, Jimmy Jimmy is World’s Most Popular song.
Image result for bappi lahiri
Bappi Lahiri – Wikipedia

The World Book of Records – London,  one of the mammoth organisations that catalogues and verifies a huge number of world records across the world with authentic certification, has acknowledged the contribution of Bappi Lahiri to global music with his immortal song ‘Jimmy Jimmy Aaja Aaja’, which is an anthem in Russia and has been translated in Russian and Chinese, has been part of the original score of Adam Sandler’s Don’t Mess With The Zohan and Top of The Chart number, rendered by Mia. Besides the above, ‘Jimmy Jimmy Aaja Aaja’ is also sung by various singers the world over. Such is its popularity. 

 
Bappi Lahiri is also acknowledged by the global organisation for being the Originator of Disco Beat in Indian Cinema. World Book of Records – London is a paramount international organisation inspiring people to showcase their talent. Under the gracious patronage of Virendra Sharma (Member of Parliament, England) , Dr. Diwakar Sukul (London – England), Karin Heschl (Vienna – Austria), Dr. Ulrich Berk (Wurttemberg – Germany), M. Vasconcelos da Silva (Sao Paulo – Brazil), Abel J Hernandez  (Bogota – Colombia), Anil Audit (Port Louis – Mauritius) and  Santosh Shukla, Supreme Court , Advocate (India) , it encourages people to break or set new records at national or international level. 

Says Santosh Shukla, President – World Book of Records,  “We all are born with a specific purpose to contribute something exclusive to the world through our exclusivity, through our hidden and extreme potential. It is a platform for all humans in this world to showcase their unique and remarkable talent and inspire the world to go one step further and progress from strength to strength.”
 
Adds Bappi Lahiri,  “It has been one long journey with innumerable accolades over nearly five decades and over 600 films. But there is something special about ‘Jimmy Jimmy’. It always has followers in every part of the globe. Such adulation brings tears to my eyes. It is the love of my fans that keeps me going.”
About Mr. Lahiri: Bappi Lahiri Bappi Lahiri 2016.jpg Lahiri in 2017 Background information Birth name Alokesh Lahiri Born Jalpaiguri, West Bengal, India Origin Kolkata, India Occupation(s) Music composer, music director, actor and record producer Instruments Tabla, piano, drums, guitar, saxophone, bongos, dholak, singing Years active 1972–present Labels BL Sound, Saregama, Venus Records & Tapes, T-Series, Tips Industries, Universal Music Group, Abbey Road Studios, Planet LA Records Website bappilahiri.com Alokesh “Bappi” Lahiri is an Indian music composer, music director, singer, actor and record producer. He popularized the use of synthesized disco music in Indian cinema and sang some of his own compositions. He was popular in the 1980s and 1990s with filmi soundtracks such as Wardat, Disco Dancer, Namak Halaal, Dance Dance, Commando, Gang Leader, Sailaab and Sharaabi.  (Wikipedia).
Advertisements

The myth of the Indian vegetarian nation

An insightful article by Soutik Biswas that first appeared in the New York Times and also BBC:

What are the most common myths and stereotypes about what Indians eat? The biggest myth, of course, is that India is a largely vegetarian country.

But that’s not the case at all. Past “non-serious” estimates have suggested that more than a third of Indians ate vegetarian food.

_100633011_gettyimages-103499049[1]
Image: BBC.com
If you go by three large-scale government surveys, 23%-37% of Indians are estimated to be vegetarian. By itself this is nothing remarkably revelatory.

But new research by US-based anthropologist Balmurli Natrajan and India-based economist Suraj Jacob, points to a heap of evidence that even these are inflated estimations because of “cultural and political pressures”. So people under-report eating meat – particularly beef – and over-report eating vegetarian food.

Taking all this into account, say the researchers, only about 20% of Indians are actually vegetarian – much lower than common claims and stereotypes suggest.

Hindus, who make up 80% of the Indian population, are major meat-eaters. Even only a third of the privileged, upper-caste Indians are vegetarian.

The government data shows that vegetarian households have higher income and consumption – are more affluent than meat-eating households. The lower castes, Dalits (formerly known as untouchables) and tribes-people are mainly meat eaters.

Vegetarian cities in India

  • Indore: 49%
  • Meerut: 36%
  • Delhi: 30%
  • Nagpur: 22%
  • Mumbai: 18%
  • Hyderabad: 11%
  • Chennai: 6%
  • Kolkata: 4%
    (Average incidence of vegetarianism. Source: National Family Health Survey)

On the other hand, Dr Natrajan and Dr Jacob find the extent of beef eating is much higher than claims and stereotypes suggest.

At least 7% of Indians eat beef, according to government surveys.

But there is evidence to show that some of the official data is “considerably” under-reported because beef is “caught in cultural political and group identity struggles in India”.

About 20% of Indians are vegetarians, according to new research. Narendra Modi’s ruling Hindu nationalist BJP promotes vegetarianism and believes that the cow should be protected, because the country’s majority Hindu population considers them holy. More than a dozen states have already banned the slaughter of cattle. And during Mr Modi’s rule, vigilante cow protection groups, operating with impunity, have killed people transporting cattle.

The truth is millions of Indians, including Dalits, Muslims and Christians, consume beef. Some 70 communities in Kerala, for example, prefer beef to the more expensive goat meat.

Dr Natrajan and Dr Jacob conclude that in reality, closer to 15% of Indians – or about 180 million people – eat beef. That’s a whopping 96% more than the official estimates.

Delhi, where only a third of residents are thought to be vegetarian, may well deserve its reputation for being India’s butter chicken capital.

But, the stereotype of Chennai as the hub of India’s “south Indian vegetarian meal” is completely misplaced. Reason: only 6% of the city’s residents are vegetarian, one survey suggests.

Many continue to believe that Punjab is “chicken loving” country. But the truth is that 75% of people in the northern state are vegetarian.

So how has the myth that India is a largely vegetarian country been spread so successfully?

Some 180 million Indians consume beef, according to new research. For one, Dr Natrajan and Dr Jacob told me, in a “highly diverse society with food habits and cuisines changing every few kilometres and within social groups, any generalisation about large segments of the population is a function of who speaks for the group”.

“This power to represent communities, regions, or even the entire country is what makes the stereotypes.”

Also, they say, “the food of the powerful comes to stand in for the food of the people”.

Why India is a nation of foodies

“The term non-vegetarian is a good case in point. It signals the social power of vegetarian classes, including their power to classify foods, to create a ‘food hierarchy’ wherein vegetarian food is the default and is having a higher status than meat. Thus it is akin to the term ‘non-whites’ coined by ‘whites’ to capture an incredibly diverse population who they colonised.”

Migration

Secondly, the researchers say, some of the stereotype is enabled by migration.

So when south Indians migrate to northern and central India, their food comes to stand in for all south Indian cuisine. This is similarly true for north Indians who migrate to other parts of the country.

Finally, some of the stereotypes are perpetuated by the outsider – north Indians stereotype south Indians just by meeting a few of them without thinking about the diversity of the region and vice versa.

The foreign media, say the researchers, is also complicit “as it seeks to identify societies by a few essential characteristics”.

Chicken is thought to be the most popular form of meat eaten by Indians
Also, the study shows up the differences in food habits among men and women. More women, for example, say they are vegetarian than men.

The researchers say this could be partly explained by the fact that more men eat outside their homes and with “greater moral impunity than women”, although eating out may not by itself result in eating meat.

Patriarchy – and politics – might have something to do with it.

“The burden of maintaining a tradition of vegetarianism falls disproportionately on the women,” say Dr Natrajan and Dr Jacob.

Couples are meat eaters in about 65% of the surveyed households and vegetarians only in 20%. But in 12% of the cases the husband was a meat eater, while the wife was a vegetarian. Only in 3% cases was the reverse true.

Clearly, the majority of Indians consume some form of meat – chicken and mutton, mainly – regularly or occasionally, and eating vegetarian food is not practiced by the majority.

So why does vegetarianism exert a far greater influence on representations of India and Indians around the world? Does it have to do with “policing” of food choices and perpetuating food stereotypes in a vastly complex and multicultural society?

10 money management tips for NRIs

ET Now has an interesting article that highlights money management tips for NRIs. The practical tips include

  • Maintain An NRO/NRE Account In A Bank In India – If you are an NRI and still have income sources in India such as income from ancestral property or from a rented out property, you can keep the money in India by opening an NRO bank account.
  • Create A Power Of Attorney To Manage Your Property In India – If you are leaving behind your property in India, you must assign a person to take care of your assets on your behalf. I
  • If You Wish To Keep Money in An Indian Bank – If you want to maintain a fund with an Indian bank, while you are abroad, you must look for a bank which has a branch in the country you reside at.
  • Watch Out For Currency Rate Fluctuations – You should be careful about the currency fluctuations when making an investment or taking loan in India. A slight change in the value of Indian Rupee against the foreign currency can significantly impact your effective return.
  • Weigh Your Options Before Taking Loan – Being an NRI, you have the advantage of taking loan from both Indian and International banks in the country you live in.
  • Manage Your Taxes – As an NRI, you need to comply with the tax laws of both countries: where you reside and in India. The tax deduction benefits in India are more or less similar for both NRIs and the residents. Still, you might want to consult a tax advisor to maintain tax discipline.
  • Stay Updated With What’s Happening in the Indian Economy – If you own properties or have money invested in India, then it is important that you stay updated with the policy and regulatory changes taking place in the country.
  • Buy Health Insurance Cover – NRIs often prefer to get treatment done in India to deal with a health issue, as there is family back home to take care of them. So a health policy in India always comes handy. You can claim tax benefits on the premiums paid under Section 80D and reduce the tax liability for income accrued from India.
  • If You Plan To Move Back To India – One of the important decisions to make once you are abroad is whether you want to continue living abroad or move back to India.

I want to explain arranged marriage to white people

A recent article in BBC.com features Pakistani designer Nashra Balagamwala and her views on arranged marriage.

When Pakistani designer Nashra Balagamwala produced a board game about arranged marriage, most news reports about her wrongly assumed she was dead against it. Actually her position is far more nuanced. And one goal is to explain to people in the UK and elsewhere how it works.

Balagamwala’s kickstarter campaign generated a lot of buzz and raised thousands of dollars more than what she was seeking.

Balagamwala was at the Rhode Island School of Design in the US when she came up with the idea.

“I was about to head home to Pakistan at the end of the year, and I had some proposals waiting for me, so I started stalking the Facebook accounts of those guys to find something about them that my parents wouldn’t approve of, so I could get out of meeting them. And then I thought to myself, ‘Why not get rid of the problem once and for all?’ So I created a list of every ridiculous thing I’ve done to get out of an arranged marriage and turned it into this light-hearted board game.”

 

She tested her game out on her friends, a mixture of South Asians and white Americans.
An American male friend was in fits of laughter while playing. He admitted to Balagamwala that he’d been worried the game would trivialise the subject, but said that he now had a better understanding of it.

art-nashra[1]

Link to an article in scroll.in

Update on PPF account for NRIs – You can continue with PPF account now

The Indian government recently announced that Public Provident Fund (PPF) accounts had to be closed when a person became a Non Resident Indian (NRI). 

A few months ago in October, the government announced that if a resident, who opened an account under this scheme, and subsequently becomes a non-resident during the currency of the maturity period, the account shall be deemed to be closed with effect from the day he becomes a non-resident.

Image result for ppf

On February 23, 2018, the government’s Department of Economic Affairs (DEA)  released an office memo  keeping its earlier notification in abeyance (or temporarily dismissed). The earlier notification was regarding the NRI’s PPF account released on October 2, 2017. According to the recent memo

Subject: Public Provident Fund (PPF) accounts held by Non Resident-regarding.

The undersigned is directed to refer to this Department’s notification GSR No.
1237(E) dated 03.10.2017 regarding amendment in PPF Scheme, 1968. As per the said
notification, if a resident who opened an account under this scheme, subsequently
becomes a non-resident during the currency of the maturity period, the account shall be
deemed to be closed with effect from the day he becomes a non-resident.

2. It has now been decided to keep the said notification in abeyance till the further
order in this regard.

Man seeking Non Resident Indian (NRI) bride duped

One frequently hears of NRI brides and women seeking NRI alliances being duped by unscrupulous men. In a strange twist.

According to media reports, Sadar police in Ludhiana (Punjab) have registered a case  against a Non Resident Indian (NRI) woman’s family, for allegedly duping a Ludhiana resident of Rs 5.50 lakh on the pretext of marrying him and and sending him abroad.

Image result for indian police cartoon

Krishan Kumar Khatri had placed a matrimonial advertisement the local newspaper calling for alliances for his daughter who is settled in Australia.  After initial conversations, the  bride’s family asked the family of Kulwinder Singh, the prospective groom for 90,000 Australian dollars. They agreed to take the money in three installments, and were paid Rs 1/2 million rupees as the initial installment. After receiving that money, the bride’s family ended all connection with the prospective groom and his family.

The father of Kulwinder complained to the local police, who registered a case under Section 420 (cheating) of the IPC against Mr. Khatri. The investigating officer from Sadar police station, ASI Ravinder Kumar, confirmed that although the ‘negotiations’ had taken place a few years ago, the family filed a complaint only in 2016. A case was registered recently after the initial investigation was completed.


 

In another unrelated news – Matrimonial website fraud: Mumbai schoolteacher claims Rs 11.5 lakh cheating by ‘NRI’

 

Trudeau in India: Are traditional Indian attires ‘too Indian’ for modern Indians ?

The Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and family, during a recent visit  to India made headlines with their flashy ‘Indian attire’ that got media and digirati debating.

One was the picture of Trudeau family in Sherwani and Sarees with Bollywood superstar Shah Rukh Khan

KhanJustinTrudeau

And then the Trudeaus were spotted at the Golden Temple in Amritsar in a spiffy Punjabi attire

TrudeauGoldenTemple

And the visit to Sabarmati in somber Reds

trudeau-sabarmati
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau along with his wife, Sophie, prays at the Sabarmati Mahatma Gandhi Ashram in Ahmadabad, India, on Monday, Feb 19, 2018. ─ AP

And at Akshardham like a newly wed Gujju couple

trudeau-akshardam

 

O Canada: Perhaps the only exception to the desi-photo-op,  was the Trudeau family visit to Taj Mahal where they managed to look ‘naturally Canadian’ 

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, his wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau, their daughter Ella Grace and sons Hadrien and Xavier pose in front of the Taj Mahal in Agra

Why is this making headlines?

All this left many Indians wondering if the Trudeau family in ‘traditional Indian attires’ were trying to be a bit too Indian. 

In case you are wondering: Contemporary Indians, especially in urban cities are more comfortable in t-shirts and jeans.

Image result for youth bangalore

Perhaps the only time one sees young men awkwardly milling about in Sherwanis or silk Kurtas are at weddings and melas. Same goes for the globalized bharitya nari, who is more comfortable in pants and jeans and not Sarees and Bindis.

 

images collated from published sources in the media: